Welcome to Harmonia Piano Tuning

Eliminating Your Piano's Sour Notes

At Harmonia Piano Tuning, I have been providing expert piano tuning and repair services for over 40 years. Serving the greater Metropolitan Washington DC area, including Montgomery County, Prince George’s County, Howard County in Maryland, and Northern Virginia, I am committed to making your piano sound its best.

Professional Expertise

Conservatory-trained technician with decades of experience in tuning and repairing pianos.

Personalized Care

Customized service tailored to each piano, ensuring optimal performance and longevity.

40+ Years

About Harmonia

Its Legacy Of Good Music

For more than four decades, Harmonia Piano Tuning has been offering piano tuning and repair services to the greater Metropolitan Washington DC area. Harmonia proudly serves Montgomery County, Prince George’s County, Howard County in Maryland, and Northern Virginia. Its commitment is to deliver expert, reliable piano tuning and repairs at reasonable prices.

If it has been over a year since your piano was last tuned or if your piano has been moved, it’s time for a tune-up. Contact us at +1 301-980-6123 to schedule your piano tuning. Upon request, we offer a mini-concert demo following each tuning session.

Service Areas:

Washington, DC


Montgomery County, MD: Bethesda, Brookeville, Boyds, Clarksburg, Gaithersburg, Germantown, Kensington, Olney, Potomac, Rockville, Silver Spring, Takoma Park.

Prince George’s County, MD: Adelphi, Beltsville, Bowie, Clinton, College Park, Ft. Washington, Glenn Dale, Greenbelt, Hyattsville, Landover, Lanham, Laurel, Mitchellville, Mount Rainier, Riverdale, Upper Marlboro.

Howard County, MD: Columbia, Elkridge, Ellicott City, Fulton, Laurel.

Northern Virginia: Alexandria, Arlington, Falls Church, Great Falls, McLean, Oakton, Vienna.

For piano tuning and repair services, call or text us. We look forward to bringing the best out of your piano.

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Experience

Piano Tuning

What Consists Of Piano Tuning

Tuning a piano is not the simple task it may seem to the average layman. Besides having 88 keys on a piano, most of those keys strike two or three strings at a time thus compounding the number of strings needed to be tuned to approximately 200. (The exact number of strings may differ slightly from one piano to another.) Thus for the piano to sound at its best, each of those strings must be tuned to the correct pitch that its corresponding key relates to.

The strings representing the tone A above middle C should be set to vibrate when struck at 440 times per second which would result in the true pitch of A. The other tones of the piano are tuned in ratio to that. However, on some pianos where the pitch is considerably lower, it might be necessary to raise the pitch as far as it will go and tune the piano to itself from that point. The reason is that sometimes the piano has to adjust to the new tension before a tuner can take the next step toward bringing it up to standard A-440 pitch. On some pianos, tuning it up to standard pitch is sometimes impossible without breaking strings or causing damage. Many families may often be satisfied with the piano being in tune to itself without the risk of raising the pitch to A-440. If this is the case, the only time one would notice a difference is when playing a piano with such a tuning along with one made on a recording with another piano.

Piano Repair

Restoring A Better Sound

In addition to a piano sounding correctly, it is important that all the keys function properly in regard to their mechanics. The workings of the piano, called the “action” has numerous parts and pieces put together. When keys do not work properly causing the mechanism not to work at all, or to work in a sluggish or sticky fashion, actual repair on the piano may be necessary. This is separate from the tuning itself and sometimes repairs can range from a minor adjustment or removing a foreign object from inside of the piano, to something more involved and costly.

Having your piano serviced regularly can help prevent or retard serious problems down the road.

KEY COVERING

Older pianos may have chipped and jagged key tops making the piano either unsightly to look at or even dangerous whereby the sharp edges may cut into one’s fingers when playing. I can give you information about replacing those old key tops so that your piano will have a new look and feel to it.

Frequently Asked Question

FAQ

Explore the FAQ page to find answers to common questions about piano tuning, repair, and maintenance. From understanding why pianos go out of tune to learning how to properly care for your instrument, we’ve got you covered.

Changes in temperature and/or humidity. A piano doesn’t know if it is played or not, so playing it (or not playing it) does not affect the tuning. The strings and soundboard contract and expand with temperature change, however not all uniformly, so hearing the various differences of string tension other than what it should be will cause the notes to sound bad. Additionally, a piano should be tuned if it is moved at all. Usually something gets knocked out of whack in a move.

Because of the above, it would be ideal to tune it every time you sit down to play it. However, that is unrealistic for the household piano both in terms of expense and time. The frequency of tunings should not be less frequent than once a year unless the piano is used in a facility such as church or school, in which case the piano should be tuned more often. Also a piano should be tuned after it is moved.

Yes – The strings representing the tone A above middle C should be set to vibrate when struck at 440 times per second which would result in the true pitch of A. The other tones of the piano are tuned in ratio to that. However, on some pianos where the pitch is considerably lower, it might be necessary to raise the pitch as far as it will go and tune the piano to itself from that point. The reason is that sometimes the piano has to adjust to the new tension before a tuner can take the next step toward bringing it up to standard A-440 pitch. On some pianos, tuning it up to standard pitch is sometimes impossible without breaking strings or causing damage. Many families may often be satisfied with the piano being in tune to itself without the risk of raising the pitch to A-440. If this is the case, the only time one would notice a difference is when playing a piano with such a tuning along with one made on a recording with another piano.

If the casing is made of wood, you could probably use any wood cleaner or polish that you use on other wood furniture in your home. On pianos with a high-gloss finish, you should use special cleaning products for those surfaces. I recommend Cory piano super gloss piano polish (may be found online). To clean the keys use wet wipes or a lightly damp cloth. BE VERY CAREFUL that no liquid seeps into the cracks between the keys.

Usually not. A piano tuning means adjusting the tension on the strings so that they sound in tune to each other (see no. 3 above). Parts that do not work properly often require extra time and labor on the part of the technician where he/she may have to take more of the piano apart to get to the problem, other than what he/she would do with a mere tuning. Sometimes new parts may be needed.

Keep it in an environment that has as little fluctuation of temperature as possible.

Keep foreign objects, such as pencils, small toys, etc. from getting inside the piano,

And try to keep plants and drinks off the piano’s top.

40+ Years

About ThePiano Technician

Meet Our Maestro: The Artistry Behind the Keys

My name is David Charney and I have been tuning pianos and servicing pianos in the Washington area since 1976. I started out being conservatory trained as a classical piano performer, then went on to teaching piano. After going to students’ homes and teaching many of the students on whose pianos needed tuning and/repair, I decided that I would expound on my knowledge of piano tuning and start to tune their pianos.

Over the years I have tuned thousands of pianos, much to the delight of their piano owners. These owners include embassies, schools, churches and other public places in addition to those pianos in private homes.

Being a musician and former piano teacher, playing music on a finely-tuned piano is truly “music to the ear.” Tuning pianos to sound good is my way of making better music in today’s world.

“As a musician and pianist myself, my goal is to provide my clients’ pianos the best service possible so that my clients will appreciate the full potential of sound that their instrument can produce.” – David Charney, technician

Testimonial

What They Say